Tuesday was Big Night for Catholic Values

Catholic League president Bill Donohue offers the following observations on [Tuesday's] electoral results:

The Catholic Church led the fight in Maine against those seeking to reinvent marriage, and won: the vote was 53-47 to repeal the state’s gay marriage law. Bishop Richard Malone deserves credit for fighting against those who sought to restructure this vital institution. Those who favor the right of two men to marry are now 0 for 31 in the states. The people have spoken. The time has come for homosexuals to pack it in.

Those who champion gay marriage and abortion-on-demand lost in New Jersey and Virginia, posting more wins for Catholic values. Jon Corzine supports the right of two men to marry and is a radical on the question of abortion. Creigh Deeds is worse: he once opposed partial-birth abortion but later switched in favor of it; similarly, he said he was opposed to gay marriage but then campaigned against a state constitutional amendment to ban it. At least Corzine was honest. In any event, the defeat of Corzine and Deeds is a victory for marriage and children.

There is one piece of unfinished business: the defeat of health care legislation that forces the public to pay for the killing of children in utero, and eliminates conscience rights for doctors and nurses. The bishops have spoken clearly on this subject. While they want health care reform, and are especially vocal about the need to help the poor, they will not support any bill that funds abortion. Nor will they support any legislation that vitiates conscience rights. President Obama, who says he is opposed to any health care bill that funds abortion, and is against nixing conscience rights, has never once registered any displeasure with current bills that do just that. Deeds tried to fool the people, and look what happened to him—he got creamed.

It was a big night for Catholic values. Hope everyone gets the message.

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  • Joe DeVet

    The USCCB was foolish to campaign for any form of nationalized health care. It’s a violation of the principle of subsidiarity, for one thing. For another, in any form it will hasten the acceptance of legalized euthanasia and assisted suicide as not only a cultural norm but the law of the land.

    Thus, they have been dithering and ambivalent far too long on current health care bills. They come late to the side of opposition to the current bills, with the result that Catholic opposition to them, which should have been mounted months ago, is likely to be too little, too late.

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