More Pro-Abortion Violence at US Universities

A pro-life display at Princeton University was destroyed last week in another incidence of violence from university abortion activists.

The Princeton Pro-Life flag display was torn apart by vandals during the night of April 19. Blue and pink flags numbering 347, meant to represent the lives of potential students lost to abortion were pulled out of the ground and coat hangers were strewn over the area.

The display sign was trampled and replaced with signs reading “support smaller class sizes: support abortion” and “347 rusty coat hangers were saved from mangling and mutilation.”

Campus Pro-Life president Tom Haine said the vandalism was particularly vindictive.

“They had to accumulate many coat hangers. They had to plan this in advance,” he said. “It was not just an act of passion.”

“It’s tragic to see such immaturity on campus and it’s sad that people cannot respond to this debate any other way. We expect more from our fellow Princetonians.”

Student Caroline Chopko, who first discovered the damage, said she was sad that Princeton students would choose to act with such destruction, but “happy that people are discussing the issue.”

In a similar incident last week a professor at Northern Kentucky University led a group of pro-abortion students in destroying a display of white crosses, erected as a symbolic cemetery for aborted babies.

Sally Jacobsen, then head of the Women’s Studies Program at NKU, was removed from her position after she encouraged students to destroy the display and participated in ripping up the display sign.

In another act of violence in March a pro-life flag display at Texas’ Baylor University was stolen during the night.

“It doesn’t surprise me that there are people who are upset by raising the topic of abortion,” said Dr. Pisciotta, who is associate professor of economics and faculty sponsor of the Baylor pro-life campus group Bears for Life.

“We’ve had over 40 million abortions and this has influenced the lives of a lot of people,” he told local news sources at the time. “I just think for a university supposedly committed to free speech that this is pretty poor behaviour on the part of some of our students.”

(This article courtesy of

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