Black Dog Days: How to Deal with Depression

Recently, I’ve been going through what the great Winston Churchill called “black dog days.” These days are defined by an overall low mood, inability to cope with basic things like getting out of bed, or finding enjoyment in my usual passions. Do not fear, reader, this is actually normal for me.

You see, I have something called Major Depressive Disorder, which was in previous times was called clinical depression. In the ancient world, the Greek physician Hippocrates labeled it melancholia. It is something I’ve dealt with for some time now, and my family has a long history of it. My family tree is full of folks who either ended up in the mental ward or at the bottom of a bottle due to this condition. A few, sadly, found more permanent ways of dealing with it.

My faith, though, has given me the hope I need to continue on. When I say Catholicism and the love of Christ have saved my life, it is not mere hyperbole.

While my condition is as much physical as it is mental, I have learned that I am not the only one who has had these low moods. The catch-all word depression can describe the condition of many men. When you factor in things like underemployment and increasing debt, it should be no surprise that so many are struggling with overwhelming sadness.

While I’d make a lousy therapist, I do want to share some methods that have helped me deal with depression. Perhaps they can help you as well.

Realize that you are not alone

No, I’m not saying “others have had it worse” or any of those other cheap and unhelpful things you’ve heard. What can be a great help, however, is knowing that you are not alone in this struggle.

The Catholic Church has dealt with mental illness for quite some time. Long before our modern system of mental health, the hospital at Geel, Belgium was established under the patronage of Saint Dymphna, the patron saint of those suffering from mental illness. A good seven centuries before psychiatrists opened offices, the good nuns in Geel introduced a system to take care of the mentally ill, and some of these patients even found healing through treatment and prayer.

As a convert, this information was quite helpful. While my Evangelical church denied mental illness and only told me to pray against it, I found that medieval nuns had the foresight to start treating those tortured by the mind. Our Catholic Church is still learning, and she offers many great resources.

Some of our finest saints, such as Venerable Francis Mary Paul Libermann and Bl. Teresa of Calcutta, suffered great bouts of depression. While they would be struck to the heart with grief, they still found comfort in their faith. Ven Francis Libermann once wrote,

“I never cross a bridge without the thought of throwing myself over the parapet, to put an end to these afflictions. But the sight of my Jesus sustains me and gives me patience.”

The Jesuit poet Gerard Manley Hopkins wrote moving words about his afflictions in the “Terrible Sonnets,” and was especially heartbroken by what seemed like the silence of God in the face of his suffering. One cannot read his poetry and not be moved to compassion for him.

I bring these figures up to show that you are not abnormal; you have intercessors in heaven and on Earth who do know that the mind has many mountains and cliffs. Perhaps it is not always enough, but I know that the loneliness can be the worst part of depression. Knowing that I am indeed among friends in my suffering has been enough for me to keep going and to find hope.

Meditate on Christ, Ask His Saints for Help

I find great comfort in the Incarnation. We as Catholics believe in a God whose love for us is so powerful that he took on our lowly nature in order to redeem it. Christ didn’t become human just to teach us some new lessons; He shows us a whole new way to be human and, ultimately, how to share in His divinity.

In my darkest moments, when I truly was giving in to despair, I found that saying the Jesus Prayer and meditating on the Nativity of Our Lord was enough to let me go on another day and pursue help. In those moments, knowing that Christ was and is among us enabled me to find just enough light and comfort to believe that life was sweeter than death.

Prayer is very hard when you are depressed. I, for one, have nagging doubts when I go through my black dog days. God seems silent and I wonder where He is and what He’s doing. All the same, I do pray, and peace eventually comes. In one case, it took me two years of praying, but peace did come. Mother Teresa’s dark night of the soul lasted several years, but she endured. You can find strength in the same faith.

If you are praying and meditating and the words do not come, then sit in silence. Find an icon or an adoration chapel and utter the words, “You are God, I am not. Please help.” If nothing else, your mind will slow down and will shift its focus to God, who sustains all life and is the source of our strength.

I know this is hard, and sometimes you will want to give up. If you can do nothing else, try to take comfort in knowing that Christ didn’t die and rise again just to leave you alone. Find the saints who did suffer from grief and depression and ask them for help. They, more than any other, are eager to come to your aid.

Seek to turn your mind to the good

My MDD is a lifetime condition that is not likely to be cured except by a miracle. While there may be some forces contributing to your depression that are beyond your control, such as growing up in a troubled home or experiencing a difficult period of your life, there are other things that you can control, and it can be helpful to focus on them.

It’s perfectly normal to want to find an outlet for your depression. In my own and my family history, that has included a cocktail of food, sex and booze. I don’t need to tell you why those are bad ideas.

Instead of harmful behavior, seek to find constructive outlets for depression. I know that a walk can be helpful, and exercise has a profound effect on your mood. It not only takes your mind off of things outside of your control, but it elevates your mood and gives you something to work towards. I personally love reading and writing. Perhaps you have a passion and your depression has made you lose interest in it. But I assure you, you will find the fire of passion coming back if you work at it for even an hour. Even if you do something as simple as clean your house or, if your depression quite sever, get up and dress yourself well, it’s a small accomplishment you can take pride in.

As you probably know, your situation has the ability to give you understanding and greater empathy. Reach out to folks to talk about it, especially if they seem to be going through similar frustrations. You will relieve loneliness, a great problem of our isolated age, and also help to build a support network for you and others.

The point of all my suggestions is to not let your grief and depression rule over all your life but to find the small things you can control and do good with them. Believe me, it’s much harder than I’m making it sound, but it can be done.

To go back to prayer, I do firmly believe that offering up your sufferings for the conversion of the world and the souls in purgatory can do great things. You are turning your mind to charity, and doing so will teach your heart to love people in the midst of grief. Christ will use your prayers and tears to bring more souls to Him.

Seek Help, If You Need It

I may have experience with depression, but I am not a doctor or priest. I’m simply a working man who likes to smoke and read. Sometimes, you need much better advice than what a man from New Hampshire can offer you over the internet.

While mental illness has a stigma in our society, there is no shame in seeking help. Not everyone needs medicine or therapy, but it is there for those who do. A resource I found helpful are the articles of Dr. Gregory Popcak who offers telecounseling at 740-266-6461. In many cases, your priest is not unfamiliar with mental illness and can be a great help. Not all priests can give you full counseling, but they can be men who you can talk to and pray with and who can offer resources for further help. Likewise, I have met many fine nuns whose wisdom has helped through many trials, and there are few weapons as powerful as a nun’s intercession.

In all things, your victory is in perseverance. As I said above, I often can’t even leave my house on particularly bad days and I have no doubt some of you are right there with me. But if we can claim small victories like seeking help and taking steps to finding comfort, then we are on the path to a greater victory.

Finally, let’s pray to the Virgin Mary, the Mother of God and the Joy of all Who Sorrow. Ask her to help you and all who are plagued by grief and depression.

This article is reprinted with permission from our friends at The Catholic Gentleman.
Michael J. Lichens

By

Michael J. Lichens is the Editor of Catholic Exchange and blog editor of St. Austin Review. When he's not revising and editing, he is often found studying and writing about GK Chesterton, Religion and Literature, or random points of local history. He holds an A.M. from the University of Chicago Divinity School and a BA from The Thomas More College of Liberal Arts. To hear some of his musings, find him on Twitter @mjordanlichens

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  • Karen Pansegro

    I am so grateful for this article!

  • jane

    Thank you. My adult step son, although not formally diagnosed fits your description quite closely. I have been praying for grace to cultivate empathy for him and his struggles. I am grateful for this article and will be sharing it with my husband.

  • mary

    As Mother Teresa said, “The most terrible poverty is loneliness, and the feeling of being unloved.” Thank you for this wonderful article! All my life I thought I am the only one struggling through this. What I should always think from now on is I’m not alone, God and all the saints are at my side. :)

  • JMC

    Cleaning house can certainly be a panacea! My mother was plagued by an undiagnosed mental illness that showed characteristics of paranoid schizophrenia and often included depression. Her coping mechanism was the beer bottle…but only at night. During the day, once she got over the inevitable hangover, when the bouts of depression hit, she cleaned house. When anxiety was about to drive her up the wall, she scrubbed.
    When I was in my early 20s, I was hit with an anxiety attack. It’s the only one I’ve ever had, and for months I lived in terror. I don’t know what I was afraid of. There seemed to be no source for it; just one evening, I began feeling afraid, and I didn’t know why. What made it worse was that there was no one I could tell; by that point, I knew my mother well enough to know that she would only make fun of me. So would my siblings. Only my father would have listened and perhaps helped, but it was impossible to speak to him alone; any attempt to do so, and my mother, fueled by her paranoia, was instantly there, listening to every word and belittling everything. Even my prayers brought little relief, since during that time I felt like there was this wall between me and God. I found that keeping busy helped. Since I was out of school and unemployed, I took a page out of my mother’s book and scrubbed. I scrubbed areas of the house she never thought of cleaning; our unfinished basement, the porch. Since both my parents smoked, whatever color our walls were painted, they eventually turned brown; I took to washing them every week. The activity helped, even if only to distract my mind from the fear.
    Eventually, the fear faded and has never returned in the forty years since then. But it taught me some valuable lessons. Primarily, the same one you bring forth: You are never alone. Despite the fact that I felt “cut off” from God, I kept praying, simply because it was all I had. And I’m certain that it helped me avoid some of the pitfalls that might otherwise have been inevitable.

  • Voice

    Two items to add. We are created in God’s image and likeness. In the throws of depression one struggles to see self worth. Yes, God redeemed us, but more importantly he created us to be like him. Second, there are also many fine deacons in the Church, some of whom are therapists or psychiatrists by profession, that can assist you, not just priests and religious.

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