Are You Running from the Truth?

The Feast of Christ the King

Dn 7:13-14 / Rv 1:5-8 /Jn 18:33-37

A very smooth advertising executive died and, by some administrative error, went straight to heaven. However, when he arrived at the gates, St. Peter had some bad news for him. “I’m terribly sorry,” he said, “but our new wing isn’t finished yet and we’ve had to set some quotas. Unfortunately, our quota for advertising and P.R. people is already filled. So you’ll just have to wait outside, unless you can persuade one of your colleagues to leave.”

“Just give me a few hours,” the ad man responded smoothly. And off he went. Before the day was over, every single ad executive in the whole of heaven had departed. St. Peter was stunned, “How did you do it?”

“Piece of cake,” replied the ad executive. “I just started a rumor that the devil was looking for a new ad agency.”

“By the way,” he continued, “I won’t be staying either. You never can tell about those rumors!”

We all talk baloney at times. It’s part of being human. But we can really get ourselves in trouble when we start believing our own baloney. And that’s what we do more often than we’d care to admit. Think of all the stories we’ve told ourselves and sold ourselves over the years.

– She’ll never find out.
– I’ll get started first thing tomorrow.
– Nobody will notice.
– Just one more time, and I’ll have enough.
– Who needs him!
– We’ll wipe ’em out, and then everything will be fine.
– I know they’d want me to have it.
– I’m sure God doesn’t mind.
– Once I get that, I’ll be set for life.

Those lines sound familiar, don’t they. They should, because we’ve probably said most of them, and believed them — partly — and walked around with our eyes squeezed shut, to keep out the truth. And worst of all, we’ve gotten angry when people have challenged us — angry when they’ve spoken up like the child in the nursery story, “Excuse me, sir, but the emperor has no clothes.”

That’s exactly how Jesus ended up condemned and in chains before Pilate in Sunday’s Gospel. When Pilate asked, “What have you done to get yourself in so much trouble?” Jesus answered, “I told the truth.” Now why would his telling the truth make so many people so angry and so fearful that they’d be willing to kill him to shut him up? Because deep down inside, where lies can’t live, they knew Jesus was right about them and about life. They knew that if they let his truth into their hearts, even for an instant, they’d have to change their lives from top to bottom. And they were afraid that that kind of change was just too much for them — afraid it would spoil what little happiness they’d been able to squeeze out of life.

They’d got it just backwards, because ironically, the lies we sell ourselves in our frightened search for happiness guarantee that we’ll always be sad. That’s because the lies that fear makes us live by always build up walls and cut us off from our best selves, from one another, and from the God who loves us.

Jesus has given us an alternative. It’s the only way of living that works, the only way of living that will bring us happiness. That’s why we call it “the truth.” The truth is this: If we make love our sole priority, and put real muscle into our loves, the walls built by lies and reinforced by fear will come tumbling down. And we’ll have the only joy that lasts.

Is loving like that really possible for us? Not on our own! But what we’re celebrating on the feast of Christ the King is that we’re not on our own. We have at our side — and on our side — the Lord Jesus, who has triumphed over all earthly powers and over death itself. And with him there, all things are possible.

So let us look our lies and our fears, large and small, straight in the eye, and call them by name, and bid them farewell. For we have seen Christ our savior; we have taken him as our Lord; and we have no need to lurk in the darkness anymore. We have embraced the truth, and it has set us free.

  • Guest

    Why is the Homily of the Day is from yesterday.
    I have subscribed Catholic Exchange website and still can not get the Homily of the Day in the current day, like I used in the past.

  • Guest

    You’re running from the truth, koshykihor . . .

    The ‘truth’ here is that folks like me keep adding alligators to the swamp of the ‘new.CE’ and some things just haven’t been reviewed for desired effect . . . Such as, why my avatar appears elswhere but not here. Of course, I wait for Kochan-avatar to take off her pancake, and lpioch-avatar to get out from behind the rocks. We are not the only ones hiding from the truth . . .

    BUT, why shouldn’t you run, and I run? – we all do – Truth is demanding, quite ultimately. Freedom therefrom can be so challenging as to be frightening.

    Why, sometimes of vices and virtues, I don’t like either pride or humility.

    I remain your obedient servant, but God’s first,

    Pristinus Sapienter

    (wljewell @mail.catholicexchange.com or …yahoo.com)

  • Guest

    To be honest with you I did not really understand your answer. I’ve asked a simple question: why when I click on the Homily of the Day I get the homily from the previous day? And I do not understand what kind of relevence has all the “alligator or avatar” answer.
    Thanks.

  • Guest

    What is wrong with this website? Why don’t I get the Homily of the Day in THE Day, not the next day or two. Today is Nov. 26th, and I get on the web the Homily from the Nov. 25th only. Just tell me DID I register wrong or what?????

  • Guest

    Yeah, with the old website, I could just add the Homily of the Day page to my favorites, and I could go right to it. Now, there are different nodes for each day. That is a bit of hassle. I am trying to figure out how to subscribe, so that it comes to my Yahoo mail account, but it’s not working. I would welcome any sugggestions.

    Peace and All Good,

    Pete

  • Guest

    I add my frustrations to the comments above. Previously, you could just bookmark the “Homily of the Day” and access it. Now it seems such a hassle to even locate it on your website.
    DS+

  • Guest

    I want to add my frustration to this web site. I have not been able to access Msgr Clark (whom I have met)homilies since this change. Please clean this up ASAP and ensure that we can use this marvelous resource to help our people understand the scriptures…I also use his homilies for daily meditation now I have daily frustration. I have tried to register and nothing shows up in my email at all…help! Fr. Mike Klarer St Victor Monroe

  • Guest

    Oh oh, bhodge, the clerics need your help and you are not coming through?

    Do you know what this can mean to your canonization, some – well – decades, at least – hence?

    I’m gonna try to sign-up for everything you so offer every day until I can assure the Vatican you got to the problem, solved it, and still warrant a long pious look. Don’t let yourself down, now . . .

    And, yes, I will whine daily, myself, as need be – uh – but, you know that already, don’t you?

    I remain your obedient servant, but God’s first,

    Pristinus Sapienter

    (wljewell @mail.catholicexchange.com or …yahoo.com)

  • Guest

    As provided on the left of several pages . . .
    “Sign up to receive . . . Digest . . . Words of Encouragement . . . Homily of the Day” – I checked all three and hit the [Subscribe] button. –
    The following page received shows –
    “The boxes currently checked are those you are subscribed to. To subscribe, check the newsletters you want and hit “Subscribe”. To unsubscribe, uncheck the boxes and hit “Subscribe”.”
    And includes the Email Address as well as a repeat of the three check boxes, all already checked.

    AND, THERE ARE NO [Subscribe] or [Unsubscribe] buttons . . .

    Seems like a glaring oversight, don’cha think? And, it says I am subscribed to all three and offering to unsubscribe me if I would . . . but can’t.

    I remain your obedient servant, but God’s first,

    Pristinus Sapienter

    (wljewell @mail.catholicexchange.com or …yahoo.com)

  • laurak

    It looks like there is still a computer glitch going on, because the dates are all wrong on these comments.

    I thought something was wrong yesterday too, when Monsignor Clark didn’t write a homily. I missed his homily and I checked twice to see if it had just been delayed, being posted but it never showed up. I was glad to see everything is ok now. I like to read his homily sometimes on Sunday mornings before we go to mass.

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