An Opportunity Missed

I don't know how many times I've been told over the years, by both friends and family, that abortion is "not the only issue." I've been accused of being unreasonable, narrow-minded, and unaware of the other important issues of our time, simply because I would not vote for a political candidate who was not pro-life. In response to such criticism I have said, more than once, that given a choice between a pro-life monkey and a well-spoken, seemingly intelligent pro-abortion candidate, I'd vote for the monkey every time. That response usually ended the discussion, with more than one roll of the eyes from those within earshot.

These unfortunate discussions have been going on for over 30 years. When first I voiced my political opinions concerning abortion so long ago, my concerns were based on what the utter disregard for the right to life of the unborn could lead to in this country. Now they are based on what that disregard has led to.

I no longer see abortion as the "only issue." I now see abortion as the front line in an increasingly aggressive assault on the American family, on human dignity and on the sanctity of life. The assault has manifested itself: in the form of euthanasia practiced in Oregon; in the 13-day starvation death of Terri Schiavo last year; in the horror of partial-birth infanticide; in "clone and kill" stem cell research bills that have been passed in Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, California, Connecticut, Illinois and Massachusetts; in the infanticide advocacy of Princeton ethics professor Peter Singer, a man whose pronouncements on this subject are applauded by a growing number of the liberal elite; and in the gradual destruction of the American family.

I also see abortion as the dividing line between those of us who believe that truth is not relative and evil is very real — and those who neither see nor hear evil because they believe it doesn't exist, because everything, including truth, is relative. In their world, everything is negotiable, anything goes, and no one is accountable. In their world, the unthinkable is acceptable if it can be linked to a promised future good.

Their view of the world has, for the last several decades, been supported and embraced by a Supreme Court dominated by activist liberal justices who have taken it upon themselves to redefine our Constitution, and with it our country, without our consent. Operating as a power unto themselves, they have, in the words of the late Justice Thurgood Marshall, used the court to "do what you think is right and let the law catch up."

The court has been used by what some call "secular-progressives" — what I usually call "liberals" — to impose upon the rest of us things we would never vote for if given the opportunity. Their crowning achievement thus far has been the infamous Roe v. Wade decision that created an industry built around the brutal destruction of the unborn.

Roe is the pillar upon which the culture of death in this country has built all its terrible hopes, and the decision that the relativist "anything goes" crowd reveres as the bulwark against religion-inspired government intrusion into "lifestyle choices." To these people, Roe is sacred and must be protected at all costs.

Protection of Roe has been accomplished by ensuring that there were always at least five committed liberal justices on the nine-person Supreme Court. Charged with that ignoble responsibility has been the entrenched liberal contingent in the United States Senate. The Senate is the body responsible for approving presidential appointments to the federal judiciary, and for over 30 years the Senate's diehard liberals have been very effective in ensuring the appointment of pro-abortion Roe supporters to the Supreme Court — until earlier this year.

With the appointment of Samuel Alito to replace the retired Sandra Day O'Connor, the balance of power on the court has shifted. There are now just as many conservative justices (Scalia, Thomas, Roberts, Alito) as liberals (Breyer, Stevens, Ginsburg, Souter), with one swing vote, Anthony Kennedy. And the oldest member of the Court, liberal John Paul Stevens, is rumored to be in poor health and thinking of retirement. A pro-life opportunity loomed.

Unfortunately, thanks to the recent Congressional elections, the Senate is now back in the hands of pro-abortionists, who will do everything in their power to keep another conservative from being appointed to the Court. The pro-life opportunity has probably been lost.

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  • Guest

    I would disagree. The pillar of the culture of death is contraception. It is what allows the “secular-progressive” create the culture of death.

  • Guest

    Permit me to add a thought -

    Can any see how the sundering of Matrimony
    - the Sacrament, and of two-become-one united together in and by vows, and joined-together by God –
    in divorce pre-saged all this before any could really see the horrors which have resulted? E.g., i.e., wasn’t depreciating and belittling the terrible results of divorce on children just a bit of ‘aborting’ the children, after all, by smothering their agonized cries and shocked voices?

    Think of it – the one, sole Sacrament behind
    love of two in this Sacrament of Matrimony ,
    love of family ,
    love of baby and baby-making/raising ,
    having elderly grandparents to lovingly care-take rather than shelve or ‘put-to-sleep’ –
    - indeed, at the heart of civilization –
    is trivialized as regularly as rain, for centuries now in legalized (and most especially in ‘no-fault’, which would be better termed ‘both-fault’) divorce.

    Simply . . .
    . . . if we can ‘terminate’ and ‘abort’ Mommums and Daddums at their life-giving Sacrament, why not Baby-ums at or before he breathes in life?
    If the Sacrament of Matrimony can be ended, why not contra-conceiving and/or aborting and/or infanticiding the fruits of what-would-be, in God-and-life-ordered morality, of the Sacrament of Matrimony?

    I remain your obedient servant, but God’s first,

    Pristinus Sapienter

    (wljewell @mail.catholicexchange.com or …yahoo.com)

  • Guest

    I have always been anti-abortion, but I used to feel that I couldn’t base my vote on a “single issue”. That changed after I started watching EWTN, and someone on EWTN (I think it might have been Father Mitch Pacwa) presented two analogies that spoke volumes to me: If there was a candidate who shared every single one of my views except that he thought we should send the Jews to the gas chambers, there is no way I would vote for that candidate. Or, if there was a candidate that shared all my views except that he was in favor of terrorism, I certainly wouldn’t vote for him. Abortion is its own holocaust, and it has to be the highest priority when determining which candidate to vote for. Like our Holy Father, I am not in favor of the war in Iraq, and I am opposed to the death penalty except for in extreme circumstances. I am also opposed to policies which favor the upper classess. However, all these issues are now second to abortion for me.

  • Guest

    If both (or all) candidates for an office favor abortion, I write my own name in. Wasted vote? Better than endorsing any who would support abortion.

    Most ‘upper class favoritism’, my dear, is MSM propaganda by elitist pro-socialist types. I’ll take ‘upper classes’ over socialist nomenklatura any day. But, really, they never tax anybody like they tax the middle class, who have less ‘loopholes’ to hide finances in.

    To me, it is pathetically paradoxical that self-made upper classes are so BigLie mistreated by such as a Ted Kennedy or a ‘Punch’ Sulzberger, who have never had to work a day in their lives, their legacies are so large. The silver-spoon babies don’t mind being in the heavily-taxed upper-class first because they have so much wealth, second because they never broke a sweat to earn their wealth – easy-come, easy-go – and, lastly, they view themselves as the elitist ‘leader’ nomenklatura of the promulgated socialist state. An amazingly large percentage of these born-wealthy types are, indeed, culture of death types – just to make sure we ‘lesser folk’ don’t reproduce too much, don’cha know. No conspiracy – so many of them just think that way in their snobbery.

    And, upper classes are no threat as compared to career politicians and ‘dynastic families’ and BigLie institutions such as PPA, NOW, NARAL – not to mention Sulzberger’s NYTimes and the ‘fellow-traveler’ WashPost. Now, here we may have a subtly covert conspiracy because such types congregate together socially, commercially, and communally. No need for a ‘dark meeting place’ if you can find out what to say and do over cocktails at the lastest gallery opening.

    I remain your obedient servant, but God’s first,

    Pristinus Sapienter

    (wljewell @mail.catholicexchange.com or …yahoo.com)

  • Guest

    I, too, have been castigated for being a “one-issue” voter. My response is always some version of the following: “Your programs for higher education, better jobs, bigger houses, etc. are very appealing. But, what good are they if there are no children to go to school?, no workers to do better work?, no families to live in bigger houses? The Bill of Rights opens with the right to LIFE, liberty, and the PURSUIT of happiness. (It doesn’t guarantee happiness, only the right to pursue it!) The first of these is LIFE. Until you understand that, I will remain a one-issue voter.” I have yet to meet the individual who can counter that argument.
    And so I remain a “one-issue voter”.

  • Guest

    With due respect to everyone I am not convinced that the foundation of the culture of death is built upon abortion, contraception, divorce, or any kind of secular philosophy. These are all what might rightly be called “pillars” of the culture of death…supporting members for sure…some more structural in their house than others…but none are the foundation. The whole death culture is really built on a foundation of nothingness…like darkness…its foundation is an absence. It’s built upon complete lack of truth and holiness. Its foundations (if anything) are insidious lies. Abortion (and the rest) lay upon this.

    I have yet to meet any traditionalist thinker or pro-lifer who does not accept some understanding of the spiritual and sacred…the catholic concept of sacrament being the highest level of this understanding. The culture of life can be said to be built on this: a holy and revered embrace of life and creation.

    True believers in the culture of death believe that nothing is sacred and people are mere biological machines who are ultimately empty. They may deny it…the may even believe in a god somewhere, of some kind, but that god has nothing to do with what to them is the weird and oppressive concept of “sacrament”. The only exception is when sin and death itself becomes twisted into the object of sacred worship.

    Some “pro-choicers” and “contraceptors” may be practicing Christians, but they are misguided members of the culture of light (albeit dim). There is hope in converting these folks to reflect the light of truth in a more life giving way.

    One might even have some success in convincing some atheist somewhere in the goodness of the culture of life by appealing to reason, but this would more likely be due to a prior experience with the sacred.

    If one wants to save folks from the culture of death (and everything that comes with it) find a way to introduce them to the ideas of the holy & sacred. Belief in and reverence for the sacred nature of life is like a vaccine for membership in the death culture.

    PS: Vote on the issues while keeping reasonable and balanced perspective: Over 1 million Americans dead by abortion each year verses how many? Almost 3000 in the whole Iraq war…etc. Do the math.

  • Guest

    Oh, yea, Casa, indeed are evil and sin at bottom – we are such fickle babies of our God!

    However, we can treat ‘symptom’ as it will lift us into His salvific graces.

    Of our dead in Iraq – our brave and beloved brothers and sisters who gave of their very last for us – reflect that even at worldly, secular levels we still must offer our martyrs. So, too, brave Iraqis who risk their all, too, to bring their nation to sane ways and means. War is the one of the oldest marks of our sinfulness, our pride and greed, and our surrender to merest materialism and utilitarianism in our march through a valley of death all too familiar and welcoming to many of us.

    I have but one issue, as a one-issue voter (or Catholic, or man): God, and His will be done. Author of life and Lover of who live, I seek His counsel in and out of voting booths and confessionals, merchants and companions.

    And, of worldly ‘reasonable and balanced perspective’, though I seek God’s perspectives, first, in His wisdom, after literally a trillion dollars spent over the last half-century on their so-called progressive programs – just WHAT progress can be demonstrated? And, in this lack, too, lack of submisison to God’s will is apparent.

    I remain your obedient servant, but God’s first,

    Pristinus Sapienter

    (wljewell @mail.catholicexchange.com or …yahoo.com)

  • Guest

    Pristinus Sapienter may I use your statement on DIVORCE, for I do agree, it is a form of contraception and I do note that it proceeded contraception and lead the way to a great difficulty in our culture.

  • Guest

    DonH – you are free to use anything I write here . . .

    . . . even against me – we can only get closer to God’s truth.

    Use it as you will. I lift so much out of here I feel like I have a branch of vatican.va in these fora . . .

    I remain your obedient servant, but God’s first,

    Pristinus Sapienter

    (wljewell @mail.catholicexchange.com or …yahoo.com)

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